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Morning Edition: Minor League Baseball Story...

This morning on Morning Edition reporter David Greene presented a story on  minor league baseball player Reid Gorecki, who was traded from his hometown team the Long Island Ducks in New York to the Camden Riversharks in New Jersey. This was just a great story overall, with great questions and in turn strong, emotional quotes. In terms of sound, Greene captured the sound of the heavy rain that washed out the game Gorecki was to play that night. It was a nice touch. Also before introducing the show newscasters played a clip of an organ recording of “Take Me Out To The Ball Game.” It was a fun, nice touch. There was locker room banter between Gorecki and his fellow teammates which brought them to life more. I would have liked to hear the crack of the ball or something like that, but, as it was raining, no one played ball that night. Here’s a link to the story on line:...
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ATC: Dub Without Borders

The ATC interview with Adrian Sherwood does a great job of integrating music and interviews to provide a great range of examples of Sherwood’s music. Sherwood is a British music producer who is releasing a new album of Jamaican dub music. Now i’d never heard of dub, even though i’ve heard of its progeny (dubstep), so it was interesting to hear the origins of a popular type of music. The interview is full of music; not only that of Sherwood, but that of artists which he has produced. The music is well synched with relevant parts, providing audio context for some of the soundbites in the interview. It starts with a guitar, and then leads into very smooth music from Sherwood’s album. From there, you are taken on a musical journey throughout dub music and Sherwood’s career making and producing music.  ...
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Scene & Sound: Weekend Edition

http://www.npr.org/2012/09/15/161182431/for-young-greeks-a-communal-escape-from-woes For this assignment, I wanted to choose a Radiolab segment. There’s really no other show that uses sound quite like Radiolab. But it’s more interesting and informative in this case, I think, to see how a straightforward audio news story is delivered with sound and scenes. Obviously, a show like Weekend Edition can’t take as many creative liberties as the Radiolab team can. So it may not be as much fun to listen to, but it’s great to hear how sound can be dispersed through a news segment in order to keep the story going. The sounds of water running, walnuts being peeled, whistling, dogs barking, vegetables being planted and footsteps can all be heard in this short, three-minute audio segment. Each sound adds to the story. And the reporter is able to set the scene by using various voices that tell the listener what’s going on. The various sounds actually depict several scenes, which I thought was impressive given the short length of the segment....
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Morning Edition – Antietam: A Savage Day In American History...

This piece marking the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam sets an indelible scene. It starts with the sound of crickets. As Tom Bowman explains where we are, the descriptions of Keith Snyder, a park ranger, paint pictures of a bloody battle. Snyder gives us vivid scenes like these: “The smoke, the noise, the artillery is crashing in from all directions. It’s just a concentrated terror.” “The vast majority of combat here is done at very close range — 100 yards and closer. It’s savage and personal. So when you pop out, the enemy is right there.” “The first thing you’re going to see is the eagle of a flag staff rising up. Then the union colors slowly coming into view. The blue hats, the curious eyes, the terrified faces, the chests the stomachs. And when that crest is filled with an entire line of union men, every confederate officer in the lane almost simultaneously screamed at the top of their lungs: fire!” Bowman also uses excerpts from a solider’s diary to further instill the direness of the scene: “I found myself on the ground with a strange feeling covering my body … My shirt and blouse filled with blood and I supposed it was my last day on earth. I had the usual feelings of home and friends and thousands of thoughts ran through my mind at once.”...
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RAMAK Increases Citizen Awareness in Haiti...

Just realized I posted this to my portfolio blog instead of We’re All Ears. Here is my civic radio example… I found is an initiative called Haiti Media Assistance and Civic Education Program known locally by its Kreyol acronym RAMAK. The initiative was organized by education development firm Creative Associates International as a way to increase awareness in Haitian citizens of their rights and to assist them in applying these rights to their daily lives using community radio stations across Haiti. To do that, RAMAK developed a 12-part radio soap-opera called Kadejak nan Ans Mari, was broadcast in Kreyol on several community radio stations. The success of that series spawned another series called Bel Pawol Kandida (which translates to pretty words), which increased citizens’ awareness of political campaigns and politicians’ accountability to its constituents. RAMAK also brought equipment to radio journalists throughout Haiti and educated these journalists on the use of the equipment, thus empowering a network of local journalists working to inform the Haitian public. Here is a link to a Youtube video from Internews posted 2009, honoring RAMAK radio stations....
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Civic-Minded Radio

Civic-Minded Radio   I listened to Voice of America’s Africa News Tonight, a news magazine show in English addressing world news, but with special emphasis on stories of interest to Africa. Most stories are covered by way of in depth interviews with correspondents on the ground in the areas they’re reporting on. The hard news stories are far more detailed and immediate than any other coverage of Africa in the US. Lighter stories on music, sports and technology are informative and engaging in a way that increases awareness of Africa as a continent with numerous emerging economies. I think this program performs a civic service not just to English speakers in Africa, but to Americans in need of comprehensive information about politics, events and critical developments on a continent we hear little about outside of wars and famine.  ...