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Gay marriage ban struck down in California, and how to make a sweet old lady...

Proposition 8, the controversial ban on gay marriage passed in 2008, was deemed unconstitutional by the Supreme Court in that state last month. New York, a gay cultural mecca, passed a bill legalizing gay marriage this year. New York City News Service’s Sean Carlson gauges the move in California in city’s Times Square.   A Brooklyn bartender describes how to make one of the signature drinks of his bar in Windsor Terrace. It’s a little bit like a gin and tonic, but with some interesting additions. ...
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Romney Squirms

I am particularly interested in how politicians respond to uncomfortable questions, as their responses are good gauges of their political deftness. Whether or not the interview itself is aggressive, a question simply asking a politician to be honest or explain their stance on a particular issue may appear to be invasive. This interview, which Laura Ingraham conducted with Mitt Romney in January, is a good example. Although Romney should be on friendly territory, his response to Ingraham’s question about releasing his tax returns clearly makes him uncomfortable. Although she is not exactly “aggressive”, Romney’s fumbled response makes it seem like Ingraham was being invasive, although she was asking a fairly straight forward...
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News Analysis, February 15

For my news analysis, I listened to Morning Edition, Newshour, 1010Wins and a show called Think Out Loud on Oregon Public Radio on Wednesday. They all differed in a number of ways for what I guess are a number of factors. Mainly, the prospective audience of the listeners mattered most — the people tuning in to that specific station probably know what they are getting, and listen to that program for a specific reason. After the issue of audience, region seemed to be the most prominent factor differentiating each show; one was more international, one was national, one was regional and another was specific to almost one city. Aside from those overarching characteristics, the other differences between the shows were between production and style. Morning Edition: The NPR show seems to be the most deliberate. The stories were all produced beforehand with an eye for high production value; sounds clips were edited nicely, music was included and the stories were well-polished. The show itself had a wide variety of content, ranging from more lighthearted pieces to serious, policy-driven stories. They were mostly national in nature, although occasionally an international story found its way in (the story about China’s vice president). Newshour: Newshour is a blend between something like Morning Edition and 1010Wins in terms of production. It is a combination of predetermined story ideas and minor preproduction. Although the stories themselves are almost always international in nature, the format relies heavily on phoned-in interviews along with scripted segments. The stories themselves are almost all serious in nature. The polished, stylized aspect that characterizes NPR is missing, although it is clear that the show is meant to appeal to a specific, more serious-minded listener. 1010Wins: Almost entirely live news coverage, relying on a host to present most of the information. A wide range of topics is covered, from more extensive sports coverage to local shootings. This station is very locally-oriented, while at the same time presenting the widest range of news topics. Although it employs some cheesy elements (the typewriter in the background, the more pronounced announcer’s voice), 1010Wins is meant to appeal to a more “common man” listener, who wants headline news and traffic updates. It listens like a local newspaper. Think Out Loud: Being from an NPR subsidiary, this Oregon Public Radio show goes the most in depth into a topic, using half an hour to explore a topic with a variety of interviews. Although it is not a straight news show, it explores a topical issue and spends a length of time investigating it, instead of covering more topics with less time devoted to each...
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Sean’s Time Square

It’s almost 8pm here, but you wouldn’t be able to tell by standing on the corner of 42nd Street and Broadway. The glow from a thousand different stores light both the street and the faces of those who walk in awe below. Languages from every corner of the globe mingle with the scent of food from every end of the earth. “J’adore New York City,” and the sizzle of grilled kebab. “Te amo Manhattan,” and the smell of roasted peanuts. A dozen taxi horns blare at once, but nobody seems to notice. This is Times Square.
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Hurricane Erin Warning

I’ve posted below a radio warning for Hurricane Erin in 1995. I am particularly interested in radio as a means of communicating vital information over a wide geographical area both because of its inexpensive means of production and its ease of access. I also imagine that as a medium for broadcasting emergency information it works very well, as the amount of people and logistical support necessary for broadcasting is minimal relative to television. Though I can’t be entirely positive, I would imagine that in the event of emergency, radio would be more of a reliable form of receiving information as both its broadcasters and listeners are less reliant on wires and large antennae.  ...