delete

Job Market Vox Pop

Here is my first VoxPop. To give a little background, I asked the people I interviewed two questions: 1) How would you describe the job market right now? 2) What jobs do you think are hiring right now? The answers to the first question were better in my opinion, so I constructed the Vox Pop from those responses. The ambient sound is just background sounds from the location, which blended pretty well with the background sounds on the...
delete

First Week of School

delete

Process Soundcloud

My process is something thousands of people do everyday: commute.
delete

George Takei

http://www.npr.org/2012/09/01/160264485/george-takei-takes-story-of-internment-to-the-stage This interview with George Takei is a really good example of using good technique. The reporter gathered a good deal of ambient sound based on the variety of it in the piece. Some of it is Takei and other actors singing, which is the most obvious of the sound used.  Much of that tape seems used almost like a quote in a print story, to illustrate the point of the piece. Good technique in radio does not seem to be that different from doing it for print. The primary difference is simply visual versus audio.   Perhaps because this is a theater story, music as background really seems to illustrate the story well because it allows the lyrics to be heard. It’s a demonstration of the writing axiom “Show, don’t tell.” Takei has a story here. He and his family were held in the internment camps during World War II. That experience would have a profound influence on his life. When the Takei family returned to California after the internment ended, they had to rebuild their lives again.  His musical Allegiance is based on that story, one of unfair imprisonment.   The success of this piece may also be in the seamlessness of it. The editing of the tape was pretty smooth, making it more pleasant to the ear.  Bad sound editing becomes very obvious to even the untrained ear because of how radio works. Audio without a visual component requires that the audio must be as close to perfect as possible. For example how the ending of the piece goes from the newscaster signing off to the tape of Takei and a female actress singing in Japanese is seamless. It appears to be a crossfade effect, where the host’s voice gets softer as the tape gets louder.  ...
delete

“Rock you like a hurricane…”...

Song lyrics aside, I did hear something interesting on the radio last night. While listening to NPR I heard a pretty compelling story. It was about the damage caused by Hurricane Issac. The writing was okay and the soundbite worked. The kicker, as we call it in print, is what got my attention. The story ended by pointing out Hurricane Katrina struck seven years ago Wednesday. Hurricane Issac is in the New Orleans area seven years to the day Hurricane Katrina struck. I found the similarity striking.