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Terry Gross interviews Mickey Edwards

I chose Terry Gross because I’ve been listening to her for years, and wanted to take a more critical approach on her interviews in light of last week’s discussion. Gross interviewed former congressmen and non-partisan advocate Mickey Edwards on his new book, “The Parties Versus the People”. Edwards is the cofounder of the No Label and the Aspen Institute. Here is the interview. In list format (I hope that’s okay), I’ve noted what stood out to me throughout the 20 minute interview.   Introduction. Gross gives a very thorough introduction, but when I glanced at the time it was less than ten seconds. Still, I felt  as if i had a good understanding of who the guest was, and why the interview was important to listen to. Her openning question asks the guest to broadly restate the thesis of his book. To get the audience all on the same page. It’s simple but I found that it worked really well. Style. Gross can say things that are complimentary but it doesn’t sound like she’s trying to ingratiate herself to the guest. It’s matter of factly, without being cold. This is something I’ve noticed about myself when I’m interviewing, I tend to either put on the  I’m-a-journalist-and-don’t-take-any-shit facade, or I’m super chummy. I’m trying to find that middle ground. Questions. Again, my impression is that her questions are loaded with information, but when I listened carefully they rarely exceeded a few sentences. Even when Gross reffers to the guest’s work, which she does often, or another outside source, she sums it up in only a few sentences. Gross lets her guest speak. Granted, this is a 20 minute interview, and is not being broadcast live. But throughout the entire aired 20 minutes, I did not once hear her trying to make her point or interject before the guest was completely done speaking.  ...
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Making a Mojito, with Katy Perry for Ambience...

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Golf Coast Begins Recovery Efforts

The piece originally aired yesterday, April 30th on All Things Considered, but I’m constantly cueing up content from across NPR programs, so listened to it this morning at 8:00am.   Here’s the quote that struck me: “He’s upstairs, he’s upstairs in his house, laying on the pool table. Said he had two foot of water. And I’ve been trying to get him rescued for a couple days, and they won’t let me come, they won’t let me come with a boat…” –  Martin Nuenes, talking about his father refusing to leave their home in Plaquemines Parish.   Here is the link to the piece.   This moment stopped me simply because it is incredibly vivid. Martin’s voice is clear, articulate, and while he is clearly concerned about his father’s well being, he is not frantic in his comments, which had a deeper impact on me. I immediately saw his father laying on a pool table in an attic somewhere, surrounded by water, waiting for help.   The other thing I noticed was that this story would not have done nearly as well in another medium. A crew couldn’t have gotten a camera to actually show you where the father was trapped; and writing the quote would have failed to convey the son’s concern for his father. I feel it is in moments like these that radio serves as the best medium....
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New Yorkers weigh in on the state of guns in America...

A clothing designer shot and killed a former coworker early Friday morning near Times Square. The shooter was killed by a barrage of police gunfire, which may have also hit and injured bystanders, said police Commissioner Raymond Kelly. The incident comes on the heels of a string of shootings across the United States. The Wisonsion shooting of temple goers in August, the Colorado theater shooting in July, the Auburn University shooting in July, to name a few. Whether or not the increased frequency of such incidents will begin to shift public opinion on gun rights across the country remains to be seen. On the streets of New York this morning, many New Yorkers appeared skeptical to view the shooting as a watershed moment for gun rights. Ronald Adams, a 24 year man from Brooklyn says (all interviews above) It remains to be seen how many more shootings will will take before Americans like Mr. Adams begins to view guns, and not people, as the...
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Joy!