delete

This I Believe – Preserving Memory

delete

Piano Across America – Interview

delete

Eggs and Radio

This report by Carrie Kahn on the Mexican egg shortage uses sound in a very effective way. After introducing the topic and explaining how price spikes are making this staple food inaccessible to a large part of the population, the sound of frying eggs pushes the story forward. This first sound not only relates to the general topic but also introduces the upcoming soundbite of a street vendor cooking eggs and showing that Mexico indeed has a voracious appetite for eggs. Later in the report, the sound of egg cartons opening and closing takes the listener straight to a scene where a man is checking for broken eggs before putting them for sale. The ways these sounds are introduced in this five minute report are also very smooth. The transitions between the script, the scenes and the interviews are spotless, and I believe this helps the listener feel familiar to and engaged by the topic. I think I had never heard a food related story on the radio before, let alone it being told in such a sensory way. Food stories usually rely on visual representations (video, photo) or on vivid, detailed descriptions (print), leaving out one of the key (although often overlooked) senses when it comes to cooking: hearing. I loved how this report reinstated it and relied on it in order to tell a compelling, successful...
delete

Best and Worst Jobs: Labor Day Voxpop

delete

Civic Radio in East Timor: Fighting Low Literacy and Isolation...

The ICFJ’s East Timor: Delivering Radio and Television News to Isolated Communities program is clearly a good example of what civic radio is. This project consists of mentoring journalists in Dili  (the capital of East Timor) to produce news spots for a radio program that airs weekly throughout the whole country. The classes are taught by Maria-Gabriela Carrascalao Heard, who is not only a Knight fellow but East Timor’s first woman journalist and the person behind this project that has been running for about 4 months now. The reporters are producing several news stories every day and putting them on air via the Radio Rakambia station. Moreover, the best stories of the week are collected in CDs and distributed to small community radios in isolated parts of the country. Due to East Timor’s low literacy rate and high language diversity (not to mention social and violence problems), radio is the perfect tool its citizens. In fact, most of the stories being aired by the project in Dili and in the isolated areas are about news that some communities have never heard and that, otherwise, would never be able to hear. In East Timor, this project is making radio go back to its roots as a democratic, accessible medium that serves the people in moments of...