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Economy Vox Pop

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National Radio Project (Civic Example)

National Radio Project looks at the journalism craft differently and focuses its attention on civic duties rather than simply reporting the news. The organization looks to examine social issues around the world and encourage civic participation. Its site said, “We go from Chicago, where workers are trying to take over the factory to save their jobs, to the Basque country in Spain, where an entire region has formed a massive co-operative society.” It tries to give a voice to those who are in need of help and asks those who listen to take a stand. National Radio Project encourages citizens to pitch their own ideas about issues that are affecting them, something that seems like a strange concept to those who are not studying journalism. Like most other stations, National Radio Project does have a job page seeking jobs and internships; it’s not completely unlike something we would see from other radio stations. A difference, however, is that it focuses on volunteering, too, whereas other radios might just stick to interns. “Help spread the word of a variety of progressive issues to a worldwide audience of over a million people,” the website said. National Radio Project also works on Making Contact, which focuses on issues like politics and talks about solutions to overcome any difficulties. The organization prides itself on Making Contact being different than mainstream media. There is a link to have listeners access Making Contact on their local radio stations. It seems that National Radio Project takes on a more civic role than other stations is because they are more interested in promoting ways to fix different problems rather than just report the facts. They seem to want listeners to be more involved an active, between pitching ideas and correcting any flaws they come across....
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Monster Music Performers (Ambient Sound Clip)...

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New Yorker Comments on New Academic Year

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GMA Radio Interview with Alan Rickman

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vzB5ds-o0jo Alan Rickman was featured on Good Morning America radio four years ago to promote his new movie (at the time), Bottle Shock. ABC’s Hilarie Barsky interviewed Rickman and provided a good example of proper radio technique journalists should practice. She begins the interview with an introduction of Rickman, which was polite, funny to the point and most importantly, described the overall direction of the interview. She did not leave listeners wondering why Rickman was being interviewed or what the segment was going to be about. She might have been holding the paper a bit too high and relying on the script a bit too much in that moment, but it was still effective. The first question was simple and direct and required Rickman to elaborate. As he answered “Tell me about your character,” she remained interested, maid an “mhm” sound to show she was engaged and did not interrupt. When looking at their eyes, you can tell that they both were making eye contact, showing that she was active and paying attention. Though Barsky was not in control of the equipment, it seemed as though everything was placed correctly (microphones at a 45 degree angle). It’s clear that ABC has the proper setup down pat, so there really is no need for her to hold anything.  The interview continued with open-ended questions like “Why did this character speak to you,” which created more full-length answers rather than just “yes” or “no.” There really didn’t seem to be too much silence during the discussion. Being that she had somewhat elaborate questions, she did not have to focus on the awkward silence to force her source to say something.  Barsky was polite, efficient and put her subject at ease, enabling him to open up about the movie. She spoke nicely and did not come across as overpowering. She definitely is someone to look to when studying radio...