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This I Believe (Updated Version)

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Interview with Musician Michael Masone

It all started in 1968 when Michael Masone worked alongside his first mentor. Since then, he has been in the music business for 44 years: fixing string instruments, appraising, giving lessons and his latest hobby: working with mechanical clocks. In this interview, Masone tells us a little bit about everything.
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All Things Considered Hazing Article

A recent story in NPR’s “All Things Considered” focused on the suspension of a university’s marching band because one of its members was killed in a hazing incident. The article, “FAMU Adjusts to Games Without Marching Band” managed to capture a scene and sound very well. FAMU’s drummer was killed in a hazing accident last November and the town seems to be blaming everyone. They are holding a meeting tomorrow, which they claim is “mandatory” and classes have even been canceled. The article capture’s thoughts on the meeting and the idea that of everyone being punished, but it also focuses on the scene: a football game without a marching band. The scene is depicted very well in the article’s pictures. Readers can see what the game is like with the football players, but we wonder if the season will be as active as it once was without the band. There is also another strong picture of the hazing victim’s funeral. Through the radio clip, we can hear the scene of the game. There are cheerleaders screaming but then there is the sound of a rapper, who is the band’s replacement. It’s kind of odd and it shows how the game has changed now that the band isn’t playing anymore – it’s an odd pairing because we would expect to hear cheerleaders and a different type of music. This sound shows the change within the scene of a FAMU game. Another effective sound was the speech/moment of silence for the deceased drumming student. It captures the sadness of the situation and how something as horrible as this can ruin games that have gone on for years. Overall, setting the scene at the football game and using the rapper and speaker’s voice was an accurate way to bring people into the article, rather than just interview people’s thoughts (which they did, too)....
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Team 1 Newscast

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Scripts from Team 1

Lady Gaga held a private party at Macy’s in Herald Square Friday afternoon for 200 lucky Little Monsters. The first 200 to purchase her fragrance received VIP passes to the event. Insert clip of girl The event followed the official “Fame” launch party Thursday night at the Guggenheim museum. No stranger to spectacle, Gaga was tattooed in front of an audience after sleeping in a giant replica of a perfume bottle for an hour. Insert clip about peeing in a champagne bottle The distinctive black fragrance was released worldwide on September first. From Herald Square, this is Ann Marie Awad New York City banned large soda drinks Thursday in an 8-0 vote. In six months, sodas 16 ounces or greater cannot be purchased in delis with letter grades, restaurants or stadium and theater attractions. Diet sodas are okay provided they have 25 calories per 8 ounces. Some are unhappy with this new law. [Soundbite] Others think there are more important things to worry about. [Soundbite] Danielle Valente, Times Square A video considered blasphemous to Islam has led to anti-American protests and attacks this past week. On Tuesday, U.S. ambassador Christopher Stevens and three other Americans, were killed during an attack in Libya. Protests have spread to over a dozen countries, including Yemen and Tunisia. Patti Kraut, visiting New York from Ohio, was angry about the video, as well as the loss of life. “I heard it was atrocious, I haven’t seen it. And I’m afraid.” Her husband, Eric Kraut, worried the protests could lead to a larger problem. “People have always worried that the Mideast could develop into a powderkeg and lead to something much bigger, and I think that is for every American the disturbing part and scary part.” Secretary of State Clinton denounced the video, saying the American government had nothing to do with it. This is Maya Rajamani reporting from Times Square. The Jewish new year or Rosh Hashanah begins Sunday and runs through Tuesday. Standing outside of a Winnebago labeled the Mitzvah Tank near 55th street, Rabbi Shia Angle says the holiday is a time to reflect on the previous year, remeber acts of kindness and take on a new resolution for the year ahead. Traditions during the celebration include attending synagogue, eating an apple dipped in honey, which symbolizes a sweet meal for a sweet new year And the SHOWFUR an instrument made from a ram’s horn. From Times Square, this is Topher Forhecz. Stoneham – circumcision New York’s Board of Health unanimously approved a measure yesterday requiring parental consent before a controversial practice associated with ultra-Orthodox Jewish circumcisions can be performed. The act requires the rabbi to place his mouth on the penis of the baby just after removal of the foreskin in order to perform suction. The Board of Health worries that the practice could pass along communicable diseases. In fact, at least 11 newborns have been infected with the Herpes Simplex virus since 2004. Two of them later died. Given the health risks, Talmudic student Aryeah Laufer doesn’t see a problem with the law so long as consent is all that’s required. (19 seconds) “Being that the one who performs the circumcision has to make sure it’s done in a fully health manner, is something that goes without saying. I personally think just as a sideput, I think hands or more uncleanly than lips. That’s a personal thought. They touch a lot more places than lips do.” Many Rabbis report that...