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All Things Considered: “Adrian Sherwood: Dub Without Borders”...

In this report by Samy Yenigun about English dub producer Adrian Sherwood, the scene is perfectly set when Sherwood describes the atmosphere and the sounds inside London reggae clubs in the 1970’s. He uses vivid language like “You thought the building was being demolished!” and as he makes a crashing noise with his mouth, the deep tremor of a dub bassline pushes in the storyline. This careful sound editing bring the listener into the scene that Sherwood is describing. It also helps that he has a cockney accent. Another great thing about this report is how we seamlessly go from one musical style to another. The transition from dub to industrial rock could seem difficult to make but Sherwood clearly explains how he applied some caracteristics of dub to industrial music as a producer with, on top of that, musical examples where the listener can hear these similarities (around 2:00).  Listening to this report also made me realize that radio may be the absolute best medium for music journalism. It avoids all the wordiness of written word reviews (I’m looking at you Pitchfork) and just replaces it with the actual music. Common sense...
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Radio Citron

Radio Citron is a Parisian web radio program run by people with mental disorders as well as their psychologists and other mental health professionals. The idea for this program came two years ago as a way to change people’s perception of these kinds of diseases. It runs once a month and features different segments such as live music, movie reviews, horoscopes or political commentary. The first radio station of this kind was created in Argentina in 1991 and is called Colifata. The great thing about Radio Citron is that it gives an outlet to people who have no way to get their voice heard. More than that, they are often people that are actively avoided by “normal” society.   Radio Citron is almost the only exposure that they have. It’s also great to hear a man who is labeled as being “crazy” saying that he didn’t understand the movie “Cosmopolis” by David Cronenberg and that he thought it was “bizarre”. Even with programming that doesn’t directly adress the issue of mental health, radio citron still fulfills its mission of reintegrating people who are on the margins of society. The listener will have no other choice but to empathize with the voices he is hearing. The show is recorded in front of a very enthusiastic live audience which gives encouragement and positive reinforcement to the amateur radio stars. It’s also interesting to note that even if it is very amateurish, Radio Citron is eminently listenable. The enthusiasm is contagious and the subject matter interesting even if it isn’t delivered in the most professional way....
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Vox Pop : Odd jobs

I asked different people what the strangest job they’ve ever had was.
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First week of school in NYC

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Going to McCarren Park