delete

This I believe – A Stainless Steel Pot....

delete

Interview: Artist and Designer Kelli Anderson...

...
delete

Obama and home brewing. ATC

Obama Polishes his “Regular Guy” Image With Beer http://www.npr.org/2012/09/15/161200943/obama-polishes-his-regular-guy-image-with-beer   In an answer to, “Which presidential candidate would you rather have a beer with?” Obama has gone one step further: brewing his own.  The report features Nick Bruening, a worker at the Brew Hut, a home brew supply store in Colorado.  Nick Bruening does his interview in the store where he works accompanied by the soft sounds of light commerce, people browsing in the background, likely scanning the shelves for some of those choice grains that apparently go into the best home brews.  The talk of the grains themselves  segues into the most distinct sound: grains being poured onto… more grains I think. To a lesser extent, there is also audio from a video clip provided by the White House website featuring the White House brew master, which is actually a thing that exists and that our tax dollars may very well be paying for.  The audio here is mostly just the brew master talking about his secret brew while the sounds of kitchen work go on behind him. In this entire story, there’s really not so much on-scene sound that it adds anything significant to the story, but it does at least suggest that the reporter got out of the studio. On at least the sampling of All Things Considered that I listened to (the weekend edition as well as the September 19th edition), I was surprised by the relative lack of stories from the field.  Even when the stories did include ambient noise, they rarely made much of an effort to weave it into the larger story.  For the most part, a heavy reliance on studio interviews seemed to stand in for the you-are-there immediacy that the ever-present ambient sound provided in the brewing story, however miniscule that ambient sound might have...
delete

Reading for the Blind.

WBRH 88.3 – Reading for the Blind and Print Handicapped (their words) http://www.wrbh.org/ http://www.i-55.com/wrbhlive/wrbh.asx (live stream)   In the age of podcasts, this Reading for the Blind station manages to be both a throwback and a natural fit for blind and younger, fully sighted audiences alike.  This is mostly because the majority of the programming is really not so different from your average amateur podcast.  (The production values are a little worse than your more professional podcasts.)   I’d assumed that stations like this one existed all over the country, but according to at least one undated NBC report found on the station’s website, this is the only reading-for-the-blind station to be found on an FM dial in the United States.   For those not familiar with the concept then, a series of volunteers come in and read articles from newspapers, magazines, and your occasional bestseller.  Late night is filled with an assortment of radio shows from what I’m pretty sure is a bygone era.  I mean I don’t think they’re newly produced.  Where they come from I’m not entirely sure.   The commitment to reading the news unfiltered extends to the rules governing the volunteers.  They are not allowed to offer any commentary on what they are reading.  In fact, they’re not allowed to say anything at all outside of what they’re reading.  There is only one reader, a woman who reads coupons, who is allowed offer her own insights.  They tend to be animated.   While I can’t speak to the effect the station has on New Orleans’ blind population, I can at least offer that sitting back and listening to a stranger read the newspaper–poor diction, mistakes, throat clearing and all–is a strangely soothing experience.  But not for too long.   Of further interest: – The station also has shows in Vietnamese and Spanish. – Even though the local daily paper, The Times Picayune, is changing its own circulation to three days a week, WBRH will still read articles from the website seven days a week. – So sure was I of my own stentorian voice—this notion has been beaten out of me within the past week—I once looked into volunteering for the station.  I found out that it’s a very hard gig to get and some of the volunteers have been there for 20 to 30...
delete

VoxPop: What do you think unemployed people do all day?...

Compiled (mostly) at Prospect Park, Brooklyn on Labor...