delete

Nurse In / How to Prepare A Halal Chicken...

Protesters at a nurse in protesting Facebook’s policy of removing photos of mothers breastfeeding: [audio:http://cdn.journalism.cuny.edu/blogs.dir/447/files/2012/02/Warner_nursein_03182012.mp3|titles=Warner_nursein_03182012] Hisham Algabbari, an 18-year-old from Aden, Yemen, explains how to prepare a chicken halal style:...
delete

Wendy Williams’ Intrusive Interview with Whitney Houston...

“You’re so like, you know, nosy.  You’re so fucking nosy, man.” -Whitney Houston to Wendy Williams On January 20, 2003, Wendy Williams interviewed Whitney Houston on WBLS-FM.  The talk, which ran just under a half hour, contained one intrusive question after another.  Williams touched on a number of topics, including, to name a few: 1. husband Bobby Brown’s time in jail 2. Houston’s drug use 3. Houston’s budgeting her mother 4. Bobby Brown’s infidelity 5. Houston’s lawsuit with her father for $100 million 6. Houston’s sex life 7. Houston’s family life 8. whether or not Houston has considered suicide 9. whether or not Houston smokes weed 10. why Houston sold her estate 11. Houston’s money problems 12. Houston’s father’s illness There were more issues touched upon as well.  Throughout the interview, Williams digs deeper and deeper, and Houston responds, often angrily.  Although by the end the two still seem on good terms.  As far as the way Williams approached the interview, she was very candid with her questions.  She also seemed to jump from one to the next, sometimes with very little attention to order.  But the interview was quite informative and effective, most likely because, despite being defensive, Houston was pretty open to talking about her personal life.  I have to say that Williams is a very bold interviewer; she didn’t seem hesitant to ask any question about any detail of Houston’s life – even pushing some of the tougher questions with followups.  There were many moments where Houston reminded Williams that she was “going too deep.” Find the interview here. On Youtube: Part 1 Part 2 Part...
delete

Radio Program Comparisons; NPR, BBC, WINS, and Fox News for 2.13.2012...

Here are some similarities and differences I observed between four radio programs on Monday, Feb. 13. NPR Morning Edition: The most formal and cerebral of the four broadcasts, NPR’s Morning Edition played out as smooth and very well edited.  It was relaxing to listen to and covered a wide variety of topics. Stories included: Massachusetts’ RomneyCare, Catholics and contraception, the increase of fiber in foods, how Girl Scout cookies contribute to deforestation, the Greek protests, winter storms in Europe, Brad Pitt’s Oscar-nominated role, bird flu research, and an iPod controversy in China, among other things.  Everything from health and science to arts, theater, and music were covered, as was world politics.  Stories that are more obscure and might be less popular with the general public, like a piece about Downtown Abbey, were looked at as well. In general, the pacing was much slower and the actualities a lot longer than on WINS or Fox News.  Morning Edition was most similar to BBC News Hour, but was still a lot less newsy and hard-pressing in its approach.  Although there were a lot of statistics and percentages thrown around. The balance of narration to actualities was varied.  Some stories were almost entirely clips, while others featured primarily the narrator.  In the way that WINS constantly declares the local time, NPR has a habit of constantly announcing “This is NPR news,” which I assume is to catch listeners who are switching through stations. Overall, Morning Edition is very professional sounding.  Narrators and reporters speak as though their coverage will be put into the Library of Congress as official go-to history.  Despite all this, it never comes off as we’re-telling-you-this… it’s very conversational. The guests commentators, as well as the correspondents, tended to enforce this.  They were allotted fairly long actualities/clips, making the whole program much smoother.  The background music only heightened this; never over-whelming, but constantly resurfacing. The narrators picked up their speed as they went further and further along.  The final piece, which was a fun bit about stashing money in offshore accounts, ran maybe a minute long.  Whereas the first story, which was about healthcare in Massachusetts was easily over five minutes. BBC News Hour: BBC News Hour feels like a cross between NPR and WINS-type local news.  It’s well-executed and features an array of experts and on-scene correspondents, but tends to be more newsy and less programmy.  Nevertheless, it takes itself seriously and projects itself as the be-all-end-all of accurate, solid news.  It’s very formal, but still gives way to intonation that feels a little bit in-your-face (possibly a British cultural thing).  The formality reaches its height at the very beginning, when the announcer says the exact time the program is being recorded, down to the second. Unlike NPR, the BBC features an overview of some of its stories at the beginning.  And, despite the overall seriousness and verbosity of the broadcast, stories are pushed along in a very fast-paced way – sometimes the announcer begins to ask another question before the interviewee has even finished.  In this way, it is much more affronting than NPR, which always seems to have an air of monotone coolness.  Despite this, I found myself getting lost more while listening to the BBC than NPR, which always seems to hold my attention. Also, while NPR is heavy on using music as a bed, BBC is heavy on nat. sound, throwing it in often.  At one point, a Jeep engine was started as a...
delete

A Scene in Times Square

This is Times Square on a February evening. The whistle of bus breaks ring in your ears. Horns honk from behind you and in front. Four men are hovered around a boom box. It plays J. Lo to their circle as they chat. One man says, “Alright, I’ll see you Saturday.” He walks off. A cop slams his car door. Another cop shuffles over to him. They eye people from their perch. A woman nearby snaps photos with a super lens. A group of tourists stare upwards. The collective light from the billboards beams onto faces. Half a dozen commuters stand at a crosswalk. They are immersed in their smart phones, oblivious to the maze around them. It’s cold, but no one is phased. There’s a collective trance here… In horns and headlights. A community feel, like a Roman Bath. Strangers suspended in the...
delete

South African Community Radio: Bush Radio...

Community radio in South Africa is a collection of stations owned by people in local communities.  It came about in the early 1990s as a way for residents to reach their community without going through the media available under the apartheid government.  Through radio, organizers were able to empower the community and set the seeds for an independent, democratic country.  Bush Radio, which is on 89.5 FM, was one of the first community radio stations to broadcast in the country.  It was founded in 1992 and, unable to get a broadcast license from the apartheid government, initially broadcasted illegally.  It became a big hit, especially in rural areas where forms of communication were limited. After the democratic elections, the Independent Broadcasting Authority (IBA) was established by the new government to manage radio stations in the nation.  Bush Radio continued to become more and more established and is now broadcasted 24/7 to the people around Cape Town. This is the radio’s mission statement: “To ensure that communities who have been denied access to resources take part in producing ethical, creative and responsible radio that encourages them to communicate with each other, to take part in decisions that affect their lives, and to celebrate their own cultures. Through such radio, communities will affirm their own dignity and identity, and promote social responsibility and critical thinking”. The station takes part in four major activities to help the community: 1. Broadcasting: the station broadcasts social and political issues to the community in three local languages (Xhosa, Afrikaans, and English) 2. Upliftment projects: the station collaborates with organizations like the South African Red Cross Society to promote awareness of issues like AIDS 3. Scholarships and training programs: the station gives scholarships to needy students they see potential in 4. Human potential development: the station has a day care center for employees and people in the community — Here’s the link to Bush Radio’s website. Also, here’s a list of South African community radio stations.  And here’s another. Here’s the wiki page on Community Radio in South Africa. And here’s a 35-minute documentary on the struggles Bush Radio experienced trying to establish...