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Kitchen Sounds

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Getting Inked

This clip documents the sounds of inking a tattoo, from setting up machines and ink to lining and shading the tattoo.  
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Longform Podcast, Episode 1

I listened to the first episode of the Longform.org podcast. The format is essentially interviews with longform journalists, and the first episode is an interview with freelance Middle East correspondent Matthieu Aikins. I thought the technique was really good because the interviewer seemed truly interested in hearing about Aikins’ experiences in the Middle East. While Ratliff and Aikins know each other, it didn’t feel like Ratliff was deliberately asking questions he knew the answers to. If he was, I wouldn’t have known it. The tone of the interview was also somewhat conversational, making it easier to follow, in my opinion. I thought Ratliff’s questions really elicited some great anecdotes from Aikins. My favorite questions were those about whether or not Aikins’ parents knew he was in Pakistan and how Aikins managed to keep notes on the drug smugglers he was traveling with (he kept them in his underwear). While I felt at times that Ratliff’s questions were a bit rambling, I never got the feeling that he wasn’t sincerely interested in Aikins’...
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Terry Gross interviews Mickey Edwards

I chose Terry Gross because I’ve been listening to her for years, and wanted to take a more critical approach on her interviews in light of last week’s discussion. Gross interviewed former congressmen and non-partisan advocate Mickey Edwards on his new book, “The Parties Versus the People”. Edwards is the cofounder of the No Label and the Aspen Institute. Here is the interview. In list format (I hope that’s okay), I’ve noted what stood out to me throughout the 20 minute interview.   Introduction. Gross gives a very thorough introduction, but when I glanced at the time it was less than ten seconds. Still, I felt  as if i had a good understanding of who the guest was, and why the interview was important to listen to. Her openning question asks the guest to broadly restate the thesis of his book. To get the audience all on the same page. It’s simple but I found that it worked really well. Style. Gross can say things that are complimentary but it doesn’t sound like she’s trying to ingratiate herself to the guest. It’s matter of factly, without being cold. This is something I’ve noticed about myself when I’m interviewing, I tend to either put on the  I’m-a-journalist-and-don’t-take-any-shit facade, or I’m super chummy. I’m trying to find that middle ground. Questions. Again, my impression is that her questions are loaded with information, but when I listened carefully they rarely exceeded a few sentences. Even when Gross reffers to the guest’s work, which she does often, or another outside source, she sums it up in only a few sentences. Gross lets her guest speak. Granted, this is a 20 minute interview, and is not being broadcast live. But throughout the entire aired 20 minutes, I did not once hear her trying to make her point or interject before the guest was completely done speaking.  ...
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Mindy Kaling on Diets, High School, and other American Pastimes...

The interview I chose to share was one that Renee Montagne from NPR’s Morning Edition conducted with Mindy Kaling, a writer and actress on The Office who now has her own show, The Mindy Project, on Fox. The interview aired last year when Mindy’s book – Is Everyone Hanging Out Without Me? And Other Concerns – came out. It’s a collection of essays about Mindy’s life and her work in TV so far, and it’s really funny. I think the interview is great because Renee lets Mindy talk more about her book – which gives a listener who has already read and enjoyed her book more insight into it – but the anecdotes Renee prompts her to talk about are also funny and interesting on their own. I thought the way that Renee sort of bantered and just had a conversation with Mindy was also great because it made the interview funnier; the sound bites they chose to play also fit in really well with the light but funny and insightful tone of the interview. When she wasn’t talking conversationally with Mindy, Renee asked open ended questions, which we talked about as an important interview technique; no “yes” or “no” answers....